Categories
Automotive

Monaro Conversion Updates

A few more of the critical parts for my GTO to Monaro conversion came in. I originally ordered the VZ Monaro front bumper kit from JHP in Australia. They were really great to deal with – professional, friendly, and really helpful when I ran into some basic issues. The only downside to using JHP was that I had to pay a 3% conversion fee with my credit card company since the charge was in Australian Dollars and my credit card company is American Express and thus uses US Dollars.

I decided I would try to find a US based company to purchase the rest of my Monaro parts. I did a little research and found TopShelfPerformance. I ordered my badge kit and side-marker repeater light kit from them. It look a really long time to get the parts from TopShelfPerformance and it’s a pain in the ass to try to get a hold of them as they never answer their phone calls, so I called up JHP and ordered my rear bumper insert from them even though they were $20 more expensive. Once I called them and placed the order, it turned out they were actually $50 cheaper at JHP than TopShelfPerformance (I guess the AUD:USD conversion swung in my favor).

The moral of the story is JHP is great and if you are looking at ordering from G8 to Commodore or GTO to Monaro conversion parts, I would highly recommend you order from them.

You can see the pictures of my GTO to Monaro conversion in progress at the following URL: GTO to Monaro 

Categories
Automotive

TX State Fair Camaro

I haven’t had the chance to make it to the Texas State Fair yet this year, but my brother did. He sent me a shot of this 2009 Camaro called "bumblebee" that starred in the movie Transformers. I’d trade my GTO in for one of these when they come out, but they will probably be way overpriced.  I guess I’ll just have to settle for a Vette.

TxStateFair_Camaro

Click the image above for a larger version. 

Categories
Automotive

Electric Cutout Installation

Here’s a quick write-up of my electric exhaust cutout installation.  I did the installation at my parents house in Georgetown with my dad.  When I say “I did” I probably really mean “we did” it – or better yet, he did it. I got the cutouts from Dave Hacker at DMH Performance .

Here’s a picture of where I installed the button.  It’s the round button right above the T/C button  (which is right above the center console  compartment).  It looks factory, so it’s kinda hard to see unless you know what you are looking for.

Finished Cutout Button

 

I ran the wires through the rubber shift boot, looking up from under the car – it’s the white rubber part on top of the transmission. I did the whole installation without taking the cover for the shifter off, but I bet it would have been a hell of a lot easier if I took it off.  I just put my hand up the side of the console to feed the wires and make the hole in the shift boot. I put my hand in the side of the console where you can see the wire hanging out in some of the pictures. I centered the switch above the T/C button and had to cut out part of the plastic so it would fit through. I  took the top level plastic off, drilled a pilot hole, then used a 3/4″ bit to make the hole for the switch.Electric Cutout Photo Gallery

The default length of wire that comes is extra long, so I just coiled it up under the center console. I had to extend the red power wire because I installed the switch right above the traction control (T/C) button and I wanted to pull power directly from the fuse box. I fed the power wire under the center console and up into the fuse box to a 20 amp fuse.  

For the time being, I wired the black ground wire onto the bolt on the passenger seat closest to the console.  There may be a good place to ground it under the console, but like I said I didn’t take the console all the way apart.

There are many more pictures in the photo gallery eCutout album

Categories
Automotive

New Car – 400hp GTO

2005 Pontiac GTO (400 horsepower 6.0 liter LS2)
Midnight Blue Metallic
6 Speed Manual

This car is such a blast to drive. Go and drive one and you'll know what I mean.  I figured the best way to learn how to drive a manual was to buy one.  The following modifications have been done to the car.

 Exterior modifications:
-18” Holden VZ wheels with Toyo TR-1 245/40/18 tires.
-Venture Shield clear bra on front fascia.

Interior modification:
-20% window tint.

Drivetrain modification:
-B&M short throw shifter.
-Skip shift eliminator.

Suspension modification:
-Hotchkis front and rear adjustable sway bars.

 GTO Picture
Click here for the image gallery.
Categories
Automotive

Camaro for Sale

Camaro For Sale Sold!

Sadly, I must sell my car. Normal maintenance and maintenance specific to the camaro has been completed on a regular basis.

The car sometimes takes a second to crank over, but it's been like that for a while (nearly 5 years) and it doesn't affect the car when running.  The motor was replaced at 62,000 miles by GM and the odometer reads 172k, which is why the car was listed at 110k.

  • On that note, I have a file full of dealership receipts and various paperwork that will come with the car.
Categories
Automotive

Jet Ski: Fixed

More info on the Jet Ski. As I mentioned before we got it up and running within the first week we had it in Dallas. It had been broken for about two years. My dad and brother attempted to work on it, but I really dont know how much effort they invested into it. We pulled the CDI box — which is a small sealed box that houses all the electronic components — only to find that it was developing it's own mini-environment inside it. If we were to buy all the individual parts inside it, we would have spent over 1500 dollars. We went on ebay and bought a $300 replacement box and had it shipped to us within the first week.

(…read more click below.)
Here's a list of the things we replaced/fixed:

  • CDI Box — all components inside
  • Throttle cable
  • Choke Assembly
  • Fuel Filter
  • Spark Plugs
  • Oil Change

The speedometer doesn't work — so we need to figure out what's wrong with that. The ski smokes a bit when it starts up, so we are thinking about doing a modification that removes the Oil Tank/Pump and allows you to manually put the oil into the gas. The guy at the Kawasaki dealership said he recommends it. It's supposed to be better on the motor and improve performance.

This saturday was the second time I got to go out on it since I've been in Dallas for the internship. I think Travis has gone out on it five or six times. It ended up costing me just over $500 dollars to get it fixed. My parents said they would pay me back for it, so I need to get all the bills together and work out a total.

It was taken to the lake (2) two weekends in a row without having the trailer registered because of the stupid system at the County Office. They were going to charge us for two years because the of the date at which we wanted to register the trailer. The last two weeks in May would have forced us to pay for the whole 2005-2006 year. We decided to wait until June and just pay for the 2006-2007 year.

It's all registered now and is begging me to ride it. I look at a little lake out my window all day and it makes me want to leave work and go to the lake. Oh well, it's just something to look forward to for the weekends.